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Lobbyists push for stricter impaired-driving laws in Canada

Anyone who has ever been stopped under suspicion of drunk driving in Brampton is likely aware that Canada's drunk driving laws are certainly not lenient. Even if charges were dropped or the individual was cleared of all wrong-doing, he or she probably wouldn't say that Canada needs to make its impaired-driving laws any stricter. That is certainly not certain lobby groups' perspective, however.

One of the fronts that organizations like MADD Canada are targeting is drugged driving, which is considered a subset of impaired driving. Not only does the organization want new methods of testing drivers for impairment, but it also wants the government to create drug limits that mirror the alcohol limits set for drunk driving charges.

Let's say that the federal government looks to countries that already have limits in place for specific drugs. Let's say that it decides to adopt limits similar to those in Great Britain. If it were to do that, it would limit the amount of LSD a person could have in his or her blood to one microgram per litre of blood. Similar limits would be two micrograms of cannabis and 10 micrograms of cocaine. Compared to the 800,000 micrograms of alcohol per litre that are currently allowed under Canadian law, drivers would be convicted of impaired driving with even the most miniscule amounts of drugs in their system.

While certain organisations push for standardised drug limits, it is also important to note that the general manager of National Forensic Services for the RCMP has said that it is incredibly difficult to set drug limits because they affect individuals differently. If someone in law enforcement is saying this, perhaps it is hasty to adopt drug limits for impaired driving at this juncture.

Source: Yahoo! News, "Tests for drug-related impaired drivers moving one step closer," Steve Mertl, 20 May 2014